Thomas Berglund
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Develop your Blues Guitar soloing by using the minor 6th pentatonic scale adding the 9th tone in the playing

When playing blues guitar one can get stucked in the blues scale and the common minor pentatonic scale. To develop and go further from that the minor 6th pentatonic scale is a good choice and when you put in the 9th tone to it you have a new palette to use to your blues playing. In this lesson I´ll show and discuss the minor 6th pentatonic scale adding the 9th tone and how to use it in the blues guitar soloing.

Below you have the A minor 6th pentatonic scale and the same scale including the 9th tone.

A minor 6th pentatonic scale

A minor 6th pentatonic scale

A minor 6th pentatonic scale with the 9th tone

A minor 6th pentatonic scale with the 9th tone

These scales creates variations and a new sound to your blues playing. Down below there are two soloing lines from my playing in the guitar lesson video. They will give you some ideas to use the scales when it can be hard to get into a new scale in the beginning. Then it´s good to catch ideas from other players and go further from them to find your own way.

Blues licks  From the m6 pentatonic with the 9th tone lesson no1

Blues licks  From the m6 pentatonic with the 9th tone lesson no2

The chord schedule to my playing and the backing track in the video is:

II A7 I A7 I A7 I A7 I

I D7 I D7 I A7 I A7 I

I E7 I D7 I A7 I E7 II

The backing track for you to practice with is in the end of the video.

Hope you´ll find this lesson useful and good luck!

PaulJones9
@pauljones   4 months ago
I'm glad you posted another lesson Thomas! All of them have been great and quite useful, thanks! It's funny because I had not heard of this scale before (well, at least not in this context), however I can recognize that major 6th sound from licks that I learned from Jimmy Page (who got them from Chuck Berry and other blues giants). I like the sound of the 6th and the 9th because it doesn't sound like the overused pentatonic minor and blues scales most guitarists use to solo when playing blues. I know you can go a long way with just the two scales, but playing the 6th and 9th definitely results in a more rich and interesting color. My question is, would this scale also work by starting from the root of each of your chords? For example: A major 6 for A7, D major 6 for D7, and E major 6 for E7? I know A major 6 works for all of them, but would that also work blues-wise? Thanks!
Thomas Berglund
@thomas-berglund   4 months ago
Thanks for a very nice comment Paul! When it´s actually a minor scale it´s works good to the root chord that´s A7 and it will have the blues feel with the minor third. When playing a D minor pentatonic scale to the D7 chord in this context can be kind of odd even though the major 6th is included and the same to the E7 chord. I have rarely use them in the context of blues but I will go home and try it now. I think that´s the best to do, try it and if you like it use it. When something sounds good one should go away from the rules that saying it would not work. So the answer to your question is to try it. It should not work but the blues should not work either so..... /best
PaulJones9
@pauljones   4 months ago
Hi Thomas! I actually tried playing the scale over each chord along the backing track of the video. The notes don't sound necessarily bad, but it does sound kind of odd. I think the A minor 6 scale fits the whole chord progression better. But as you put it, you have to try it in order to get an idea. Anyway, thanks for the advice!
Thomas Berglund
@thomas-berglund   4 months ago
Nice that you tried the scales. I get the same experience as you when trying these scales to the particularly chords. A minor 6th pentatonic scale is the most natural to play at least in this style. Maybe it can be another experience in another kind of style.

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