michael.socarras
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1, 2 & 3 Octave Pentatonic and Blues Scales

Happy Monday! 

Mondays don't have to suck. They can be the start of a GREAT new week. Onward we go to a new lesson on pentatonics and blues shapes up to 3 octaves. 


I was working on my speed and realized I was jumping too far ahead with 3 octave scales so I toned it back a notch and came up with these fingerings. I tried to make them as (easy to play fast) as possible. You will have to do some position shifts but it shouldn't be hard. You've probably seen these scale shapes and patterns before but I wanted to put it all on one pdf for ease of use and clarity in my head. 

I wrote them out in E Major and in all 5 shapes for both the pentatonic and the blues scale. I also wanted something new and fresh. I wrote the scale not from the root to the root, but from the root to the note BEFORE the root. This way the scales stay with 5 notes for the pentatonic and 6 notes for the blues which makes it easier to ascend and descend. 

When I start the next octave I start with my index finger.I found I get some really cool ideas this way and also helps for speed. Melodies come easy as well whenever I play something in a fresh way. 


P.S. Check out my other lesson on speed where you can log all your scales.

Alright here we go...Please comment and let me know if I can make this easier for you to use or understand. DOWNLOAD it and put it on your desktop folder of lessons so you can easily access it. 

1, 2 & 3 Octave Pentatonic and Blues Scales.pdf Pentatonic and Blues Scales in 3 Octaves
1, 2 & 3 Octave Pentatonic and Blues Scales.pdf, 520KB

PaulJones9
@pauljones   9 months ago
Thanks for the PDF file Mike! Always very useful, the speed log pdf has really helped me improve my speed. I print all of them. These two octave fingerings are a great complement to the speed log too ;), and as you put it in the lesson, by using different fingerings you can come up with fresh ideas and melodies. Looking forward to the next lesson!
Savo Kostic
@savo-kostic   9 months ago
Well, I am far away from playing it in the speed you talk about. :D But its good tho.
michael.socarras
@michaelsocarras   9 months ago
yea the speed will come with time. theres nothing wrong with playing them slow. very cool melodies will come out. thanks for your comment savo!
michael.socarras
@michaelsocarras   9 months ago
PaulJones9:
Thanks for the PDF file Mike! Always very useful, the speed log pdf has really helped me improve my speed. I print all of them. These two octave fingerings are a great complement to the speed log too ;), and as you put it in the lesson, by using different fingerings you can come up with fresh ideas and melodies. Looking forward to the next lesson!


thanks Paul! So glad its helping you!. haha coming soooon. Guitar rules!!
Flekador
@fl3k   9 months ago
Thanks for the contribution Michael.socarras! I will certainly be using these a lot.
michael.socarras
@michaelsocarras   9 months ago
no problem!
DDaneskovic
@ddaneskovic   9 months ago
Very interesting scale pattern. It is always useful to practice scale that we all know in some other method or pattern.
One great music teacher (I think it is violin teacher and if my memory doesn't abandon me his name was Ivan Galamijan) put in words in his method of violin playing ("Playing the violin and violin pedagogy") one very important sentence about playing the scales and the point is this:
- We should start our practice with scales every day, but each day we should start with practice something new in that scale. It could be new scale, or old one (which was practiced before) but now in some other rhythm, fingering pattern, new articulation, dynamics or in different positions on fingerboard, in different tempo and etc.
The point that this great teacher want to tell us is not use same way of practicing every time. Our mind is always lazy and after a while we will move our fingers automatically, without any influence of concentrate thinking. And there is the problem. When our mind is stuck in some closed system we can not have any progress. And in the same time that is always hard to push our mind to think and to be concentrate to problem. Good musician is always self-critical on his work, was it a music technique or great music art, but in the same time this context is hardest for us to admit.
Thanks any way Michael, and "Let there be practice..."
michael.socarras
@michaelsocarras   9 months ago
I really like what you wrote. Awesome stuff and inspiring as well. Think I'm gonna check that book out. Cheers!!