Daniel Kaczmarczyk
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Guide on how to find EVERY note on the fretboard - part 5

Welcome to the fifth part of learning the fretboard course! This lesson will focus on the G note and the method I call "one-note picking madness".

At fist - the G note map. If you are not sure from where the notes came from - check out previous lessons.

E|---||---|---|-G-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---||---|
B|---||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|-G-|---|---|---|---||---|
G|-G-||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|-G-||---|
D|---||---|---|---|---|-G-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---||---|
A|---||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|-G-|---|---||---|
E|---||---|---|-G-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---||---|
   0            3       5       7       9           12

The method, called "one-note picking madness" is, as the name impies, a great picking practice that also gives your fretboard knowledge a boost. There are two ways to do it and both will be presented.

First method.

This is about picking the notes in order of their placement on the fretboard. So - you start off with playing the G note on the 6th string, then you play a G note on the 5th, and so on, as you will hit the G note on the 1st string. Then go back, all the way down. All has got to be done within 12 frets.

Sounds relatively easy, but where is the catch?

The first catch is to play any note that lays on the empty string, on the 12th fret of the same string, to keep left hand moving. Also, this makes you more familiar with the shapes of magical triangles mentioned earlier in the series.

The second catch is to keep a steady rhythm when playing this. And by steady I mean making no mistakes at all. Start very slow, I suggest setting up the metronome to 50 - 60 bpm and playing quarter notes. If you have to slow down, slow down, but keep hitting the correct notes.

This is the tab that shows you the first example, using our today's guest - the G note. Practice it untill you will be able to hit the notes at 100bpm or so.

E |----------------|-----3----------|-------------||
B |----------------|--8-----8-------|-------------||
G |-----------12---|-----------12---|-------------||
D |--------5-------|----------------|--5----------||
A |-----10---------|----------------|-----10------||
E |--3-------------|----------------|--------3----||

The second method.

This method is similar to the first one, but is more musical, in a sense. It's becaouse you will play the G note melodically - raising the octaves, and after hitting the highest note possible, and going down. All within 12 frets, and playing the same notes twice if they lay on two frets within the range of the exercise. Also, keeping rhythm as before.

Here it is how it can look like.

E |----------------|-----3----------|-------------||
B |----------------|--8-----8-------|-------------||
G |-----------12---|-----------12---|-------------||
D |--------5-------|----------------|--5----------||
A |-----10---------|----------------|-----10------||
E |--3-------------|----------------|--------3----||

The permutation of this exercise can be extending the range of the exercise and playing all the avaliable G's on the fretboard in few more ways possible. Experiment and create yours own variations. Here are some of my suggestions. It can look like this:

    #1                               #2
E |-----------15---|--15------------|-----------15---|--15------------|
B |--------8-------|-----8----------|----------------|----------------|
G |----------------|----------------|--------12------|-----12---------|
D |-----5----------|--------5-------|----------------|----------------|
A |----------------|----------------|-----10---------|--------10------|
E |--3-------------|-----------3----|--3-------------|-----------3----|

#3
-----------15---|--15------------||
----------------|----------------||
--------12------|-----12---------||
----------------|----------------||
----------------|----------------||
--3--15---------|--------15-3----||

Thank you for yours attention and remember to be creative in this practice! Explore your fretboard and be curious about everything. Knowledge is power and results of this kind of pracice get back to you when you are composing or improvising.

As always, mostly - have fun and practice with all the 12 notes !

Daniel Kaczmarczyk.

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